Cooking with Whole Grains

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Cooking with Whole Grains from the Whole Grain Council

Whole grains offer so many health benefits: Reduces stroke risk, reduces risk of type 2 diabetes, reduces heart disease risk, helps maintain healthy weight, reduces risk of asthma, promotes healthy blood vessels, reduces risk of inflammatory disease, and promotes healthy blood pressure, among other benefits.

Grain Pilaf:

Brown small bits of onion, mushroom and garlic in a little oil in a saucepan. Add grain and cook briefly, coating the grains in oil. Then add broth in the amount specified below, and cook until all liquid is absorbed.

For my Master Pilaf Recipe using various grains go here.

Important: Time Varies

Grains can vary in cooking time depending on the age of the grain, the variety, and the pans you’re using to cook. When you decide they’re tender and tasty, they’re done. If the grain is not as tender as you like when “time is up,” simply add more water and continue cooking. Or, if everything seems fine before the liquid is all absorbed, simply drain the excess.

Collect Whole Grain Recipes

Lemon Farro and Brussels Sprouts

Lentil and Barley Soup

Maria’s Quinoa with Black Beans and Corn

Maria Faires Meatless Quinoa Vegetable Lasagna

Quinoa Duo with Vegetable Melange from Trader Joe’s

Recipes: Quinoa with Celery and Mushrooms and Tilapia with Chile Lime Butter

Master Grain Pilaf Recipe

Simple Black Beans and Barley or Farro

Shortcut

A shortcut is to cook whole grains in big batches. Grains keep 3-4 days in your fridge and take just minutes to warm up with a little added water or broth. You can also use the leftovers for cold grain salads (just toss with chopped veggies, dressing, and anything else that suits your fancy), or toss a few handfuls into some canned soup. Cook once, and then take it easy.

Prepare Ahead and Freeze Whole Grains

The trick to freezing grains is to attempt it with heartier grains, avoiding tiny grains like teff and amaranth which do not freeze well.  Brown rice, freekeh, farro, millet, wheat or spelt berries, and brown rice freeze well. Go to my blogpost here for details.

To 1 cup
of this grain:

Add this much
water or broth:

Bring to a boil,
then simmer for:

Amount
after cooking:

Amaranth

2   cups

15-20   minutes

2 1/2   cups

Barley,   hulled

3   cups

45-60   minutes

3 1/2   cups

Buckwheat

2   cups

20   minutes

4   cups

Bulgur

2   cups

10-12   minutes

3   cups

Cornmeal   (polenta)

4   cups

25-30   minutes

2 1/2   cups

Farro

2 1/2   cups

25-40   minutes

3   cups

Kamut  grain

4   cups

soak   overnight then
cook 45-60 minutes

3   cups

Millet, hulled

2 1/2   cups

25-35   minutes

4   cups

Oats,  steel cut

4   cups

30   minutes

3   cups

Pasta,  whole wheat

6   cups

8-12   minutes (varies by size)

varies

Quinoa

2   cups

12-15   minutes

3   cups

Rice,  brown

2 1/2   cups

25-45   minutes (varies)

3   cups

Rye

4   cups

soak   overnight then
cook 45-60 minutes

3   cups

Sorghum

4   cups

25-40   minutes

3   cups

Spelt berries

4   cups

soak   overnight then
cook 45-60 minutes

3   cups

Teff

3   cups

20   minutes

2 1/2   cups

Wheat berries

4   cups

soak overnight then
cook 45-60 minutes

2 1/2   cups

Wild rice

3   cups

45-55   minutes

3 1/2   cups

 

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