Mountaineering Training and Hiking Resources

What an adventure! This is me crossing an ice bridge on Mt. Rainier.

I am steadfastly here to support you and your fitness as you train for your mountain climb. I have put together here some resources on that you will find helpful.

Refer to my blogs and YouTube videos for information that will help you with your fitness and nutrition for the climb. I have compiled a helpful list of some of my blogs, workouts and videos for you to refer to below.

#ClimbForCleanAir registered climbers: I am available for complimentary 30 minute phone calls to answer your personal questions. Email me at ActiveNutrition@comcast.net to set up your appointment. If you have a quick question at any point during your training, reach out to me via email.

For the complete printable version of the climbing program go to this document:

7 Month Mountaineering Program For CFCA by Maria Faires, RD

And if you haven’t already, like my business page: Active Nutrition Fitness and Nutrition Consulting.

MY BLOG:

https://www.myactivenutrition.com/blog/

I suggest accessing my blog via your computer. Sadly, my blog is not mobile optimized and on your mobile phone you will not see the right hand column that contains links to topics.

SPECIFIC BLOG POSTS OF INTEREST:

Supplemental Iron for The Mountaineer

Fueling for Performance for Hiking and Mountaineering

Choosing a Sports Carbohydrate Replacement

Low Back Pain When Hiking, Backpacking and Trekking

What Food Should I Take Mountaineering on Summit Day?

Fueling Up to Maximize Muscle Growth and Recovery

Camp Muir Mt. Rainier 1 Day Glacier Trip Hike Pack List

Camp Muir Mt. Rainier Day Hike Tips

Healthy Hiking or Snowshoeing Lunch and Snacks

Maximize Your Post-Workout Recovery with the Best Exercise Recovery Techniques

Sports Nutrition for the Dancer

Progressive Hiking Schedule Snoqualmie Washington Region

Camp Muir Mt. Rainier Day Hike Trip Report

Hiking Snack: Processed versus Real Food

Last Minute Tips Before Your Mountain Climb

WORKOUTS YOU CAN DO AT HOME:

Even if you do not have access to a gym, there are plenty of other options for in-home and outdoor workouts.

One of my favorite options is the Xiser mini stepper machine. It folds to a flat 4-inch piece of metal to fit in your backpack, carry-on, under the desk, etc. The way the hydraulic system is made in Xiser products is totally different from other  steppers. this is the perfect machine for doing high intensity interval workouts!

Discount Promo Coupon Code for Xiser Stepper. Save $15 for each Portable Stepper purchased from Xiser

Follow this link to the retail site and use the discount coupon code maria35 in the shopping cart for a $15 dollar discount on each new Xiser Stepper you purchase from Xiser Industries.

If you do not have a TRX, I HIGHLY recommend it!

Full Body TRX Workout Video 

TRX Workout For a Strong Sculpted Body

Sailboat Workout (workout with minimal equipment)

Travel Vacation Home Workout No Equipment

Stair Training For Mountain Climbing or Backpacking 

Foam Roller Workout For Recovery 

Interval training workout: https://youtu.be/5wi6kARs7Us   Ignore his claim that you will lose 10 pounds in 1 week. Not true. But I enjoy doing his interval workout because I can just follow along! You can adapt this to walking, running, any piece of cardio equipment.

My YouTube channel with exercise demos:

Https://www.youtube.com/user/MyActiveNutrition

As always, I appreciate your Facebook likes, shares or comments.

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Progressive Hiking Schedule Snoqualmie Washington Region

Mailbox Peak Summit September 2019. Say hi if you see me out on the trail!

The benefits of hiking are numerous. Hiking improves physical fitness, lowers cholesterol and blood pressure and improves mood and enhances mental wellbeing.

I suggest progressively increasing the difficulty of your hikes. If you are training for a backpacking trip or a mountain summit, it is best to start training in earnest at least 8 weeks before a backpack trip or 6-8 months before a summit. Prior to that, it really helps to start with a good base of cardiovascular exercise such as moderate walking, jogging, biking and thus already have basic conditioning. If you do not have this base, a 12-16 week progressive build-up to pre-trip hiking fitness is more appropriate. Maria Faires, RD is a mountaineering fitness and nutrition expert. 

Training helps you enjoy the hike, backpacking or summit climb. You are more relaxed and fully present to appreciate your surroundings if you are not under the physical and psychological stress of being overwhelmed with the effort of hiking.

Contact me if you need assistance planning your fitness regimen for mountain climbing or backpacking. I’ve successfully climbed Mt. Rainier, Mt. Baker, Mt. Adams, Mt. St. Helens, Mt. Angeles and trained dozens of clients to climb those and Mt. Everest (See the testimonial from Dan Akerman), Aconcagua, Mt. McKinley, Mt. Blanc, Kilimanjaro, Elbrus, and Carstensz Pyramid.

Want to know how to hike downhill to save your knees? View my YouTube video here.

Some of these hikes are not accessible during the winter season. Check WTA.Org for trail reports, weather reports, directions and pass requirements.

Maria Faires’ Progressive Hike Schedule Snoqualmie Region

Hike Mileage RT elevation gain Feet/mile elevation gain High Point Difficulty Rating
Rattlesnake Ledge 4 1160 580 2,078
Margaret’s Way 5.5 1500 545 1,730
Tiger 3 5 2,100 840 2,525
Poo Poo via Chirico 3.8 1,760 926 1,850
Talapus/Ollallie Lake Exit 45 6.2 1220 394 3780
Annette Lake 7.5 1400 373 3600
Olallie Lake via Pratt Lake Trail Exit 47 6 na na na
Poo Poo Via High School 8 1700 425 na
Kamikaze Falls 6 1420 473 2370
Little Si 4.7 1,300 553 1,550
Snow Lake 7.2 1700 472 1830
Cable Line- West Tiger 3 3.0 2022 1348 2522
Twin Lakes & Lillian Lake 9 2000 445 5300
Pratt Lake Basin 11 2300 418 4100
Melakwa Lake 8.5 2600 611 4600
Mason Lake 6.5 2420 744 4320
West Tiger Four-Summit Loop 9.6 2830 na 2948
Mt. Si 8 3150 787 3900 24
Bandera 8 3400 850 5240 26
Mt. Washington Exit 38 Ollalie 8.5 3250 764 4450 24
McClellan Butte 9 3700 822 5162 26
New Mailbox 9.4 4,000 851 4,822 27
Granite Mountain 7.6 3,658 962 5629 28
Old Mailbox 5.2 4000 1538 4882 37
Camp Muir Mt. Rainier 8 4,600 920 10,080 32
Camp Muir to Summit 4,330
Paradise to Mt. Rainier Summit (although typically done in 2 parts) 16 9010 1126 14,411 39

Hike Difficulty calculated using http://www.nwhiker.com/HikeEval.html

 

 

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Mountaineering Training Program For The Climb for Clean Air

7 Month Mountaineering Training Program For The Climb for Clean Air

This training information is provided by Mountaineering Fitness expert Maria Faires, RD

Hello! I am excited to present this program to you and thank you for climbing with us and raising money for the support of the American Lung Association’s mission of saving lives by improving lung health and preventing lung disease.

I am Maria Faires, RD. My volunteer role is to provide you with a comprehensive training program so that you have the fitness level to summit our magnificent mountains safely and have fun doing so.

I am a Registered Dietitian, Master Personal Trainer, and Medical Exercise Specialist. My specialties include sports nutrition and fitness, mountaineering fitness and high altitude nutrition, corrective exercise for those with injuries, weight loss and lifestyle programs. I have climbed most of Washington’s prominent peaks and have assisted many hikers, backpackers, and mountaineers achieve their goals, including the seven summits and the Explorer’s Grand Slam.

Focus of This Training Program

  • Increasing strength of the entire body and focusing on the muscle groups used for mountaineering.
  • Increasing cardiovascular endurance and the energy systems used for mountaineering.
  • Increasing balance and the kinesthetic ability to move efficiently over rough terrain.
  • Increasing mental stamina and toughness.
  • Increasing anaerobic threshold.
  • Minimizing injury potential.
  • Increasing flexibility.

FOR A CONVENIENT PRINTABLE VERSION OF THIS ENTIRE PROGRAM CLICK HERE

Being in peak physical condition is the single most important aspect for climbers to maximize their climbing potential. When it comes to summit day, the stronger a climber is, the better the body will be able to handle the incredible physical demands it will face. The better the physical condition, the more likely a climber is to perform well, and have an enjoyable experience.

Climbing a mountain with snow, rock, ice and steep, uneven terrain requires a significant amount of strength, aerobic endurance and balance.

Training Program Components

First of all, it is strongly recommended that each participant consult with a physician to ensure that no health conditions exist that could interfere with the physically rigorous demands of training for the climb.

This general plan has been designed with that in mind. Within the plan there are several important components that should be included in your climbing prep training.

This training program consists of several vital training components:

  • Stretching and foam roller self-myofascial release
  • Balance and functional training
  • Anaerobic interval workouts
  • Recovery and rest
  • Aerobic workouts
  • Stair/hill climbing
  • Strength training
  • Hiking

Each component is essential and is included to bring out the best in you and get you on your journey injury-free.

Plan out your weekly schedule based on the monthly guidelines for each component. Use the goals and work out details to schedule your weekly schedule making sure you have included all the workout elements each week. Notice that each month is a progression. When training, we want to stimulate the body to adapt. To do it safely, it is best to gradually increase exercise progressively.

By the time you are 2 weeks from your climb date you should be able to ascend 4600 feet, 4.5 to 5 miles in 5-6 hours (including one hour in breaks) carrying the amount of weight that your mountain guides recommend for your climb day hike from start to basecamp.

Adjusting This Program to Your Fitness Level

The purpose of this program is to challenge your physical stamina and strength gradually. You may find that the first month of this program is too easy if you exercise routinely and have an aerobic base established already. You may need to increase the duration or modify the program and you might be ready for more elevation gain and the harder workouts recommended later in the program. For some of you, this program may start off too hard and so you must gradually work into the routines and increase your stamina and strength one day at a time. Listen closely to your body. The best way to train is safely, gradually, and carefully.

Strength Training

Strength training is necessary to provide the overload needed to stimulate muscle growth in your legs, core, and upper back and shoulders. This strength will make your climb feel easier, your pack more comfortable to carry and the whole experience more enjoyable. It is best to do full body workouts. Or do a split upper body or lower body workout. Include exercises for your quads, hamstrings, glutes, low back, chest, back, shoulders, rear delts, biceps and triceps, low back and core. Take a full day off in between your full body workouts or body parts. In general lift enough weight that you are fatigued between 10 and 12 reps. Each body part should be worked two to three times a week. Be sure to include a dynamic warm-up before weight training. In addition, include functional training to challenge balance, agility, strength and coordination to train your body to work efficiently on unstable mountainous terrain.

Functional Training and Balance

Functional exercises recruit multiple muscle groups at one time and require coordination, focus, and core strength. Functional training can be used to strengthen you in a way that directly translates to an activity or sport. For instance, a step-up is a functional exercise that allows you to train the muscles of the body to work together in a way that you will use when mountaineering. On the mountain it will be necessary to take high or long steps without the use of your arms. If you are performing a step-up as part of your training you’re training your body to be a system that can get that done efficiently.

Other examples of functional exercises are: Anti Rotation Side Lunge with Press, Balance Disk Squats, Ball Bench Pillar Plank Leg Lifts, Burpees with Frog Jump, Elevated Bowler Squat, Forward Lunge with Overhead Reach, Forward to Back Lunge, Single Leg Squat with Frontal Plane Reach, Single-Leg Raise Shoulder Press.

Balance training is required to help you navigate uneven and difficult terrain. An example of this is the One Leg Squat Touchdown. My YouTube channel has a video of each of these exercises.

Cardiovascular Training

  • Anaerobic interval workouts
  • Aerobic workouts
  • Stair/hill climbing
  • Hiking

Our bodies rely on three different energy systems for performing work. The phosphagen system, glycolysis and the aerobic system. During mountain climbing you will use all three so all three have to be well trained.

Aerobic Workouts

The aerobic system is the one that you will rely on most for climbing. ATP is the body’s energy currency. The aerobic system generates energy in the form of ATP in the presence of oxygen. So, in your training, for aerobic cardio workout sessions, keep your heart rate in the 70-80% Maximum Heart Rate (MHR) zone. Calculate your Maximum Heart Rate using the Hunt formula: 211 – 0.64*age. (If you are on a Beta blocker, Beta blockers reduce the maximum heart rate). Use the talk test, Borg 1-10 scale, or a heart rate monitor to ensure you are in the correct training zone. Aerobic training can include running, biking, swimming, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, stair climbing, elliptical trainer, rowing, Stairmaster, stationary bicycle, treadmill, jogging, walking, or inline skating, for instance.

 

BORG TALK TEST EXERTION HEART RATE
1 Normal talking and breathing Very Light 40-45%
2 Normal talking and breathing Light 46-50%
3 Can carry on a conversation, light breathing Moderate No Sweat 51-55%
4 Can carry on a conversation, moderate breathing Moderate Sweat 56-60%
5

 

Can carry on a conversation, heavy breathing Moderate Vigorous Sweat 61-67%
6 Unable to say more than 2 sentences Vigorous 68-75%
7 Broken sentences, heavy breathing Vigorous Strenuous 76-80%
8 Syllables only, very heavy breathing Strenuous 81-85%
9 Can’t talk, very heavy breathing Strenuous Severe 86-92%
10 Can’t talk, gasping Severe 93-100%

 Anaerobic Interval Training

In addition to the aerobic system, our bodies rely on two anaerobic systems to generate ATP in the absence of oxygen. Glycolysis (or lactic acid system) and the phosphagen system (also called the ATP-CP system).

The phosphagen system provides energy at a rapid rate for short-term, intense activities lasting 15 seconds or less. Stepping up a series of steep rock steps, for instance.

Glycolysis is the predominant energy system used for all-out exercise lasting from 30 seconds to about 2 minutes and is the second-fastest way to resynthesize ATP. Walking quickly uphill to get out of dangerous terrain, for instance.

Anaerobic interval training improves the two anaerobic energy systems needed for mountain climbing. Interval training involves a series of medium to high-intensity exercise bouts interspersed with lower intensity periods. This type of training is difficult and also helps build mental toughness. The exact intervals you should do is dependent on your fitness level, the energy system you wish to train and chosen activity.

Interval training benefits include an improved VO2 maximum (the highest amount of oxygen one can consume during exercise) and thus an improved cardiorespiratory system and a higher lactate tolerance ability which means your endurance will improve and you’ll be able to fight fatigue better so that you can work out comfortably at a more intense level. This will allow you to sustain more work over longer periods of time at lower heart rate levels. Your legs, lungs, and heart will get used to spikes in heart rate and the physical exertion needed on the mountain.

In this program, it is very important that you include 10 minutes of low intensity cardio (65%-80% MHR) as a warm-up prior to every interval workout.

Best to do the interval training on a day by itself. Interval training is so intense you need a rest.

It is important that your “work” minutes have a high intensity. You should be sufficiently tired and breathless that you are unable to maintain a conversation.

If you are unable to keep the pace up for the suggested work interval time, then you’ve started too hard, and should go a little lighter the next time to manage to go the whole prescribed time.

Don’t stop before the work interval is up, adjust the intensity so you can continue the whole work interval.

Active Rest Breaks

Between each interval, you should perform active rest like walking or slow jog at a heart rate of approximately 60-70% of HRmax so the body and can recover for the next interval.

Anaerobic Glycolytic System Interval Training Workout Example

Glycolysis is the predominant energy system used for all-out exercise lasting from 30 to 120 seconds.

To train the Glycolytic system, perform fast intervals lasting 30 seconds to 2 minutes with an active recovery period that is twice as long as the work period. Gradually increase the time you perform each work interval and number of intervals.

The intervals can be anywhere from 30-120 Sec Work and 1–4 Min Active Rest. During the work intervals you should be too short of breath to talk. Active rest means you should move; you should perform active resting at a heart rate of approximately 70 % of HRmax. Here is an example program.

30 Sec Work: 1 Min Active Break

  • 10 minute warm-up to get you sweating
  • 30 seconds of hard cardio exercise so you’re very short of breath
  • 1 minute active break – move around
  • Repeat. Start with four rounds.
  • 5 to 10 minutes relaxed walking as a cool down
  • Gradually increase number of intervals with each workout, eventually to 10 -20 repetitions.

Anaerobic Phosphagen System Interval Training Workout Example

The phosphagen system provides energy at a rapid rate for short-term, intense activities lasting 15 seconds or less.

To train the Phosphagen system perform fast intervals lasting 10-30 seconds with an active recovery period that is three as long as the work period. Gradually increase the time you perform each work interval and number of intervals.

The intervals can be anywhere from 10-30 Sec Work and 30-90 Sec Active Rest. During the work intervals you should be too short of breath to talk. Active rest means you should move; you should perform active resting at a heart rate of approximately 70% of HRmax. Here is an example program.

Anaerobic Phosphagen System Intervals 15 seconds: 45 seconds

  • 10 minute warm-up to get you sweating
  • 15 seconds of hard cardio exercise so you’re very short of breath
  • 45 seconds active break – move around
  • Repeat three more times.
  • 5 to 10 minutes relaxed walking as a cool down
  • Gradually increase number of intervals with each workout, eventually to 25 to 30.

Hiking

Hiking is the best and most applicable activity you can do to prepare for your climb. The hiking goals I have provided are challenging. Try to do at least three hikes a month at those recommendations and plan to hike as often as you can, at least once a week. Recommendations are given for backpack weight and elevation gains. Hiking can substitute for an Aerobic Workout, Interval Workout or a Hill/Stair Workout. Do Intervals and Aerobic workouts and Hikes on separate days.

Hiking can substitute for an Aerobic Workout, Interval Workout or a Hill/Stair Workout. But make sure you are getting the same amount of total workout time in each week. If I recommend 4 Aerobic, 2 intervals and 1 hike and 1 50 minutes hill program. Instead you could do a hike instead of an aerobic session and a 50 minutes hill program if your hike consisted of a significant amount of incline. Just make sure you are being honest and getting all the work in. Each component has an important role in the overall plan.

If you don’t have access to hiking, consider running or walking stairs or using a stair climber and training on hills. If you have a treadmill, gradually increase the incline. To prepare your body for the rigors of wearing a heavy pack during your climb, train with a pack.

For those of you who are sole city-dwellers, it is possible to still get in in great shape for your mountain climb. Follow the guidelines and instead of a hike, substitute a long cardio session, perhaps of varied modes. Include lots of step ups. Regularly climb stairs in a high-rise building, sign up for a couple duathlons or triathlons. Or create your own once-a-week endurance workouts triathlon-style building up to something like a 400 meter swim, a 14 mile bike ride and a 3.5 mile run.

Stairs/Hill Climbing

Stairs and hill climbing is necessary to prepare your body for the rigors of performing thousands of step movements on your climb. If you do not have access to stairs you can walk up a steep hill or use a stair climbing cardio machine. And, you can hike instead of doing a stairs or hill climbing workout occasionally.

To do a hill workout, find a very steep hill that will take 10+ minutes to climb. Wearing a backpack with 10-25% of your body weight, climb the hill. Gently walk down. Repeat. Going downhill can tire out your quads quickly. On your way down, relax and lean forward from the ankles (leaning backward increases the impact on your legs.

If you haven’t done stair workouts before, you should plan to start slowly and gradually build up the duration, frequency and weight of your pack, and intensity. Make sure you warm up prior to your stair running workout. It is very important that you include 10 minutes of low intensity cardio (65%-80% MHR) as a warm-up prior to every stairs/hill climb workout and a slow walk as a cool down after to let your heart rate recover.

To do stair climbing, begin by walking one step at a time. Avoid running stairs on your first few workouts. By your sixth stairs workout you can begin running, sometimes two steps at a time. Use the return to the bottom as your rest interval, and then do another set. During these workouts you will find that your heart rate tends to get elevated on the way up and decreases on the way down. You can even start the habit of going up the stairs in your home two at a time!

Rest and Recovery

Rest and recovery after exercise is essential to muscle and tissue repair, strength building and subsequent performance. This is even more important after an intensive workout. Your rest days can include shorter, less intense version activity such as walking, stretching or foam rolling.

Optimal sleep is essential for anyone who exercises regularly. Sleeping is the body’s most natural way to take care of the recovery and provides time for the muscles to grow and repair. Keep track of your sleep duration and quality and then assess and make a plan if necessary. So nap, sleep in or whatever it takes to get enough sleep, especially the month before the climb.

Stretching

Stretch major muscle groups minimally three days a week or more often if you’d like. Target areas you know you are tight. Consider having a professional such as a medical exercise specialist (Maria!) or a physical therapist evaluate your flexibility. Do stretches when you are warm and immediately after your cardio or strength workout. Muscles are like silly putty: warm muscles stretch easily, cold muscles snap and break. Hold each stretch for a total of 60 seconds or more. It is also helpful to include a dynamic warmup prior to your strength training as this also helps improve mobility.

Foam Rolling

Foam rolling (also called self-myofascial release) can improve flexibility, perceived muscle pain perception, and the recovery of strength performance. Foam rolling can be done before your stretching, as a warm-up activity, or post workout as a recovery strategy. This is my favorite video on How to Use a Foam Roll

Tracking Your Workouts

To make sure you are staying on schedule, I suggest keeping track of your workouts either in a journal, calendar or training app.

Adding Weight to Your Backpack

Guidelines used by recreational backpackers are that a person should be able to carry about 20% of their body weight. More experienced backpackers should be able to carry 25% of their body weight. That being said, you do not need to train with that much weight, especially at the beginning. Start with 10% of your (ideal) body weight and gradually increase the weight each week until you have topped out at training with 25% of your (ideal) body weight. It will improve your confidence for the climb if you do at least one hike with the amount of weight that you will be carrying on the mountain.

For additional weight in your pack you can carry extra water weight in your pack on the way up. One gallon of water weighs 8 pounds. If necessary, you can pour some out at the top to save your knees on the way down, though keep some for hydrating or washing up on the way down.

Once you start adding significant weight to your pack, use trekking poles to aid your balance while wearing a heavy pack.

Ideal Body Weight and Body Composition

Climbers will benefit from being as close to their ideal body weight as possible. The less bodyweight, the less weight a climber has to carry up the mountain. Take a look at the professional guides and mountaineers. They are all lean. The best way to assess this is a body fat test. I recommend my female clients have a body fat percentage of 17-24% and my male clients 12-17%. Find a clinic with an InBody body fat machine or BodPod.

Nutrition

To summarize the points I think are important nutritionally:

  • Consider having a blood test to check for iron-deficiency anemia. People with anemia are more likely to suffer from altitude sickness and fatigue than are persons with normal blood counts. People who are diagnosed with iron deficiency anemia will want to take an iron supplement before and during travel to high altitudes. Those with borderline low will want to consider taking a supplement to aid in red blood cell production. Note that excessive amounts of Iron in the body can be harmful so if you are considering taking an iron supplement do not take an extreme amount and check with your doctor or dietitian for advice on the right dose for you. This article discusses iron needs and protocol.
  • Consider a good quality multivitamin/mineral supplement since high activity levels in athletes may increase their vitamin needs.
  • Focus on highly nutritious, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant rich foods. The athlete needs plentiful amounts of antioxidant rich foods to reduce the oxidative stress secondary to heavy training and altitude exposure.
  • Create a plan for nutritious pre workout and post workout recovery food in addition to snacking and good hydration habits during workouts and hikes.

Start Now and Be Consistent

Whatever you do, once you have made the serious commitment to this program, be consistent and stick with it! And begin right away. Give yourself ample time to get ready for this mountain climb.

Need Assistance? Contact Maria

For more comprehensive and individualized climb preparation training, participants can consult with me for a personalized program. I offer a complimentary 30 minute phone call and a discount to Climb for Clean Air Climbers if they want ongoing support. Contact me and we can work together to ensure you are in prime condition for your climb adventure.

And don’t underestimate the importance of good nutrition. If you think your diet can be improved for optimal performance, schedule a nutrition consult with me.

Let’s Get Started!

Using your climb date, decide what month to start based on what training you’ve been doing already and your climb date. If your climb date is July 27, your date to start the “6 month prior” segment is January 27.

On the left the program states weekly goals for the month. The far right column gives more details and reminders of tasks to get done that month each week. Each week, plan ahead and determine what days of the week you will perform each workout using the guidelines given in the program instructions. Your workout tasks will include Aerobic, Intervals, Hills or Stairs, Strength, Hike, Foam Rolling, Stretching and Rest.

 Here is an example of how to plan a weekly “7 months prior” workout schedule.

    • Aerobic train 4 days a week
    • Strength train 2 days a week
    • Hike 1 day a week
    • Rest 1 day a week
    • Stretch 3 days a week
    • Foam Roll Workout 2-5 days a week
7 month prior Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Aerobic 4 X

30 minutes

X

30 minutes

X

45 minutes

X

45 minutes

Rest Day Walk
Strength 2 X X
Hike 1 Hike Little Si Trail
Stretch 3 X X X
Foam Roll X X X X

Here is an example of how to plan a weekly “1 months prior” workout schedule.

  • Aerobic train 2 days
  • 2 interval training sessions
  • Strength train 2 days a week
  • 1 Hill/stair climb
  • Hike 1 day a week
  • Rest 1 day a week
  • Stretch 2-3 days a week
  • Foam Roll 2-5 days a week
ONE MONTH PRIOR Monday  

 

Tuesday

 

 

Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Aerobic Walk 15 Walk 15 90 min

Aerobic

45 min

Aerobic

Hills or Hike Rest Day Walk 60 min
Intervals X X
Strength X X X
Hike 3500-4600’ gain 9-10 mi. 20% BW
Stretch X X X
Foam Roll X X X

If you need help determining where to start, contain me! For more comprehensive and individualized climb preparation training, participants should consult with me for a personalized program.

Mountaineering Training Program For The Climb for Clean Air

This plan has been designed by Mountaineering Fitness Expert Maria Faires, RD and is copyrighted.

This is a general plan. For more comprehensive and individualized climb preparation training, participants should consult with Maria for a personalized program. https://www.MyActiveNutrition.com

It is strongly recommended that each participant consult with a physician to ensure that no health conditions exist that could interfere with the physically rigorous demands of training for the climb.

7 Month Mountaineering Program For CFCA by Maria Faires

WEEKLY GOALS WEEKLY SCHEDULE WORKOUT DETAILS
WORKOUT DAY
  M T W T F S S  
SEVEN MONTHS PRIOR TO

DATE:________

Aerobic train 4 days a week

Strength train 2 days a week

Hike 1 day a week

Rest 1 day a week

Stretch 3 days a week

Foam Roll Workout 2-5 days a week

                Aerobic training for a minimum of 40 minutes per session. Keep heart rate 65-80% MHR. Gradually increase duration and intensity.

Strength training. Focus on putting together a program that works every major muscle group and learning good technique. Each exercise should include 2 sets of 10–12 reps so that muscle failure occurs on last rep. Include functional and balance exercises.

Hike goal: 1600 to 2100’ elevation gain, 5-8 miles and 10% BW pack weight.

Rest from strenuous exercise one day a week. Include walking, stretching or foam rolling that day.

Stretch each muscle group 3 days a week.

Foam roll 2-5 days a week.

Have your body fat checked. If it’s above my recommendations consider a healthy weight loss plan.

Focus on good nutrition at meals and post workout recovery foods. Plan nutritious snacks for hiking and practice good hydration.

Aerobic

 

             
Strength

 

             
Hike

 

             
Rest

 

             
Foam Rolling/ Stretch              
WEEKLY GOALS WEEKLY SCHEDULE WORKOUT DETAILS
SIX MONTHS PRIOR TO

DATE:________

WORKOUT  DAY
Aerobic train 4 days a week

One interval program a week

Interval 1 day

Strength train 2 days a week

Hike 1 day a week

Rest 1 or 2 days a week

Stretch 2-3 days a week

Foam Roll Workout 2-5 days a week

  M T W T F S S Aerobic training for a minimum of 40 minutes per session. Keep heart rate 70-80% MHR. Gradually increase duration and intensity.

Add in a 20 to 30 minute interval program a week this month once a week. Gradually increase duration and intensity over the month. Include 10 minutes of low intensity cardio (65%-80% MHR) as a warm-up prior to every interval workout.

Strength training. Each workout should include 2 sets of 10–12 reps so that muscle failure occurs on last rep. Include functional and balance exercises.

Hike goal: 1800-3200 elevation gain, 7-10 miles and 12% BW pack weight.

Rest from strenuous exercise one day a week. Include walking, stretching or foam rolling that day.

Stretch each muscle group 3 days a week.

Foam roll 2-5 days a week.

Focus on good nutrition at meals and post workout recovery foods. Plan nutritious snacks for hiking and practice good hydration.

Aerobic
Interval
Strength
Hike
Rest

 

Foam Rolling/ Stretch
FIVE MONTHS PRIOR TO

DATE:________

Aerobic train 4 days a week

2 interval programs a week

Hill/stair climb 1 day a week

Strength train 2 days a week

Hike 1 day a week

Rest 1 day a week

Stretch 2-3 days a week

Foam Roll Workout 2-5 days a week

WORKOUT M T W T F S S Aerobic training for a minimum of 45 minute sessions at 70-80% MHR. Gradually increase duration and intensity.

Do one glycolytic system and one phosphagen interval training workout. Include 10 minutes of low intensity cardio (65%-80% MHR) as a warm-up prior to every interval workout.

Include hill and/or stair climbing workout at least once a week for at least 30 min.

Strength training. Increase sets to 3 sets of 10–12 reps so that muscle failure occurs on last rep. Include functional and balance exercises.

Hike goal: 2500-4300 elevation gain, 7-10 miles and 14% BW pack weight.

Rest from strenuous exercise one day a week. Include walking, stretching or foam rolling that day.

Stretch each muscle group 3 days a week.

Foam roll 2-5 days a week.

Focus on good nutrition at meals and post workout recovery foods. Plan nutritious snacks for hiking and practice good hydration.

Aerobic
Intervals
Hill or Stairs
Strength
Hike
Rest
Foam Rolling/ Stretch
FOUR MONTHS PRIOR TO

DATE:________

Aerobic train 3 day a week.

2 interval training sessions

Hill/stair climb 1 days a week

Strength train 2 days a week

Hike 1 day a week

Rest 1 day a week

Stretch 2-3 days a week

Foam Roll 2-5 days a week

WORKOUT M T W T F S S Aerobic training for a minimum of 50 minute sessions at 70-80% MHR. Gradually increase duration and intensity.

Do one glycolytic system and one phosphagen interval training workout. Include 10 minutes of low intensity cardio (65%-80% MHR) as a warm-up prior to every interval workout.

Do a hill and/or stair climbing workout once a week for at least 30 to 40 min.

Strength training. Increase sets to 3 sets of 10–12 reps so that muscle failure occurs on last rep. Include functional and balance exercises.

Hike goal: 3000 to 4600’ elevation gain, 8-10 miles and 16% BW pack weight.

Rest from strenuous exercise one day a week. Include walking, stretching or foam rolling that day.

Stretch each muscle group 3 days a week.

Foam roll 2-5 days a week.

Focus on good nutrition at meals and post workout recovery foods. Plan nutritious snacks for hiking and practice good hydration.

Aerobic
Intervals
Hill or Stairs
Strength
Hike
Rest
Foam Rolling/ Stretch
 
THREE MONTHS PRIOR TO

DATE:________

Aerobic train 3 days a week

2 interval training sessions

1 Hill/stair climb

Strength train 2 days a week

Hike 1 day a week

Rest 1 day a week

Stretch 2-3 days a week

Foam Roll 2-5 days a week

 WORKOUT M T W T F S S Aerobic training for a minimum of 60 minutes per session. Keep heart rate 65-80% MHR. Gradually increase duration and intensity.

Do one glycolytic system and one phosphagen interval training workout. Include 10 minutes of low intensity cardio (65%-80% MHR) as a warm-up prior to every interval workout.

Do 1 hill and/or stair climbing workout for 45 minutes.

Strength training. 2 to 3 sets of 8-10 reps. Include functional and balance exercises.

Hiking goal: 3200-4300’ elevation gain, 8-10 miles 18% BW pack weight. Use the pack you will be using for climb day. 2

Rest from strenuous exercise one day a week. Include walking, stretching or foam rolling that day.

Stretch each muscle group 3 days a week.

Foam roll 2-5 days a week

Consider an overnight backpack trip to test your gear.

Monitor for overtraining.

Focus on good nutrition at meals and post workout recovery foods. Plan nutritious snacks for hiking and practice good hydration. Start practicing with the food and snacks you will take on your climb. Ask your doctor if additional iron is right for you.

Begin purchasing and/or borrowing the gear you will need.

Aerobic
Intervals
Hill or Stairs
Strength
Hike
Rest
Foam Rolling/ Stretch
 
TWO MONTHS PRIOR TO

DATE:________

Aerobic train 2 days a week

2 interval training sessions

1 Hill/stair climb

Strength train 2 days a week

Hike 1 day

Rest 1 day a week

Stretch 2-3 days a week

WORKOUT M T W T F S S Let’s build up plenty of endurance:

Aerobic train 1 day a week for a 90 minute session and 1 day 60 -70 minutes.

Do one glycolytic system and one phosphagen interval training workout. Include 10 minutes of low intensity cardio (65%-80% MHR) as a warm-up prior to every interval workout.

Do a hill and/or stair climbing workout 2 times, once at least 60 min.

Strength train but decrease weight as needed and do 10-12 reps. Make sure you are doing 3 sets. Include functional and balance exercises.

Hiking goal: 3300-4600’ elevation gain, 9-10 miles with 20%.BW pack weight. Use the pack you will be using for climb day.

Rest from strenuous exercise one day a week. Include walking, stretching or foam rolling that day.

Stretch each muscle group 3 days a week.

Foam roll 2-5 days a week

Consider an overnight backpack trip to test your gear.

Be sure to get extra sleep this month for recovery.

Monitor for overtraining.

Focus on good nutrition at meals and post workout recovery foods. Plan nutritious snacks for hiking and practice good hydration. Continue practicing with the food and snacks you will take on your climb.

Ask your doctor if additional iron is right for you.

You should have completed purchasing and/or borrowing the gear you will need.

Aerobic
Intervals
Hill or Stairs
Strength
Hike
Rest
Foam Rolling/ Stretch
ONE MONTH PRIOR TO

DATE:________

Aerobic train 2 day

2 interval training sessions

Strength train 2 days a week

1 Hill/stair climb

Hike 1 day a week

Rest 1 day a week

Stretch 2-3 days a week

Foam Roll 2-5 days a week

WORKOUT M T W T F S s Rigorous workouts will help build your mental confidence. You’ve trained hard up to this point. Keep going!

Aerobic train 2 day a week for a 70 minutes.

Do one glycolytic system and one phosphagen interval training workout. Include 10 minutes of low intensity cardio (65%-80% MHR) as a warm-up prior to every interval workout.

Include hill and/or stair climbing workout 1 times, once at least 60 min.

Strength train but increase weight as needed and do 12-15 reps. Do 2 sets this month. Include functional and balance exercises.

Rest from strenuous exercise one day a week. Include walking, stretching or foam rolling that day.

Stretch each muscle group 3 days a week.

Foam roll 2-5 days a week

Consider an overnight backpack trip to test your gear.

Be sure to get extra sleep this month for recovery.

Monitor for overtraining.

Be sure to get lots of extra sleep this month for recovery.

Consider an overnight backpack trip to test your gear.

Hiking goal: 3500-4600’ elevation gain, 9-10 miles with a 20% BW pack weight. Use the pack you will be using for climb day.

Your last week before departing to the mountain can be a light modified routine. Cut out strength, hiking and intervals. Continue with active rest days like walking, stretching, foam rolling. Focus on extra rest, eating healthy foods, no alcohol or recreational drugs, hydrating and packing for your trip.

Focus on good nutrition at meals and post workout recovery foods. Plan nutritious snacks for hiking and practice good hydration. Continue practicing with the food and snacks you will take on your climb.

Ask your doctor if additional iron is right for you.

Pack for your trip early in the month.

Aerobic            
Intervals              
Hills or Stairs              
Strength              
Hike              
Rest              
               

Maria Faires, RD

Mountaineering Fitness Expert

Master Personal Trainer

Registered Dietitian

MyActiveNutrition.com

Copyright Statement: The contents of this document are protected by copyright. The copyright and intellectual property rights of all material belong to Maria Faires. Copying of material is for personal, non-commercial use only. The reproduction, publication, or distribution of this document for commercial purposes is forbidden. Content must not be altered or adapted in any way and written permission must be sought for the inclusion of content in papers or other publications. Maria Faires, RD Copyrighted 2021

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